Friday, 12 May 2017

How to go from Worrier to Warrior


Worrying is one of the easiest things to do in life.
Imagine this: You are at an amazing place in your life. You just graduated university, got a new exciting job; You're happy.
Then you start thinking of all the task of your new job and start to see challenges over excitement. Your perspective changes and suddenly you start worrying. Am I good enough for this? Are the task bigger then my ability?


How to go from Worrier to Warrior



1. Know the power of your mind

Our mind is one of our most powerful weapons, so is our brain and yet they are not the same.
While many use both terms interchangeably, brain and mind, although often overlapping, are fundamentally different concepts.

The brain is a physical space. It coordinates your movement, your organism, your activities and transmits impulses. But it is not where you think.

Thought takes place in your mind, the "manifestation of thought, perception, emotion, determination, memory and imagination", that resides in your brain.

They are not the same, but they do work together.

Think of it this way:

In a fight your brain equips you with the necessary physical ability to win.
It gives you energy (adrenalin) and controls every muscle in our body. It gives you all needed resources.

But no one can win a fight without a strong mind.

In boxing the mind is trained just as much as the muscle. Our mind is what makes the difference.
If two boxers with the exact same physical ability meet, but one believes in himself and the other doesn't, who do you think would win?

We can't control our brain, but we can control our mind.

2. Replace your thoughts

What we think has direct impact on what we do and how we react. What many forget is that it is you who controls your mind and not your mind that controls you!

There actually is a study that shows that how we interact in a social environment is drastically changed by how we 'prime' ourself.
If you go into a room with negative thoughts on the event or yourself, chances are you won't enjoy the event. Seems pretty logical right?

Now what happens when you do have negative thoughts, but you take a moment to 'prime' yourself and replace them?  If you take a moment to say: "I will go into this room and I will be confident, social and I will enjoy myself."?
The likelihood of you enjoying yourself increases immensely.

How is it different with our life and tough situations?
It isn't. How we succeed has direct impact on how we approach.

"You cannot endure what you can't enjoy" - Steven Furtick.


See the downs in your life as a challenge; Replace your thoughts:

I'm not like everyone else -> I am uniquely gifted and talented.

I don't know what to do with my life -> I can take on an incredibly adventure of finding myself.

I have no idea what to study -> I am privileged enough to follow whatever I dream.

I fail at everything -> I am learning!

I don't know what to do about this problem -> I will overcome this challenge and grow.


And these are only a few examples of how you can change your perspective!


3. Know the Worth of the War

The main difference between a Worrier and Warrior is the outcome of the fight.
A worrier is set back by challenges, forgets his own strength and ability and puts situation over strength. Risk > Reward.
A Warrior finds his strength in the situation and grows beyond ability. He sees the reward of the risk and takes it on courageously.

The most important thing: All of us can be warriors!

If you face a tough challenge, ask yourself these mind shifting questions:

1. Which strength can help me overcome this situation and what weaknesses are being challenged?

2. Who can help me improve my weakness and will help me to victory?

3. What part of this situation will have lasting positive impact on my growth?

Do you have any more ideas on replacing your thoughts? What helps your overcome?


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